Online dating hazards

This plan, published in 1799, shows the many streets and squares that would be lost to the new docks - more than half of Wapping south of Pennington Street.The following year, Parliament passed the London Dock Act and details were published of the land and properties destined for compulsory purchase.The title of this plan appears at bottom left, with an explanatory note and scale bar at bottom centre.An illustration of the general construction of the railway features at bottom right. A year later, it reached London Bridege, which became the first railway terminus in the capital.Names of individual businesses, property lines, and addresses were also often recorded.Together these maps provide a rich historical shapshot of the commercial activity and urban landscape of towns and cities at the time. These plans were made for most important towns and cities of the British Isles at the scales of 0 (1 inch to 40 feet), as well as many foreign towns at 0 (1 inch to 50 feet).The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. This detailed 1887 plan of London is one of a series of twenty-six sheets in an atlas originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks.The British Library holds a comprehensive collection of fire insurance plans produced by the London-based firm Charles E. Plan of the London Docks with title along the top and imprint, key and reference table in panel below the plan.

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The plan is oriented with south at the top and features title and scale bar at lower left and key to colour at top left.The title appears along the top, with compass rose, scale bar and table of reference in the centre.This "key plan" indicates coverage of the Goad 1887 series of fire insurance maps of London that were originally produced to aid insurance companies in assessing fire risks.Yet the riverside quays were still those first licensed in 1558.In 1793, the decision was taken to ease the congestion by digging deep-water basins where ships could be moored in more secure and controlled circumstances.

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